" objectification is not the demonstration of one's beauty (eg dancing and clothing), rather it may involve this without respect to their subjective significance (eg the manipulation of dancing, manipulation of clothing, exposing oneself without commitment, etc) "

- philosophy of the body  

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" the objectified need to subjectify themselves around good people thereby honouring them (possibly even attracting them on a subjective basis) "

- philosophy of the body  


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